Products » Beans & Pulses

Dried beans, peas and lentils, collectively known as pulses, have been part of man's staple diet since ancient times and are still an important food for vegetarians and meat-eaters. They are low in fat and rich in protein, carbohydrates and fibre, as well as being a rich source of B-complex vitamins and are the best vegetable source of folic acid, in addition they provide iron, calcium and phosphorous.

IMG 3466aThey are also a good source of phytoestrogens which are believed to be beneficial in womens health, cardiovascular health, osteoporosis and certain cancers. Available as dried or canned beans, peas and lentils; they have a long shelf life and are economical and nutritious.

STORAGE, PREPARING & COOKING PULSES

Store in an airtight container in a cool, dry place.

All dried beans and peas require soaking before cooking.

Dried beans and peas can have either a long or short soak – see instructions below. Soaking helps to clean and soften the beans and speeds up cooking time. It also makes them more digestible by releasing the phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors which protect the plant, but can cause gas and inhibit nutrient absorption.

Traditional cultures took great care to prepare their beans  with a long soak before cooking to enhance digestibility and nutrient absorption.

Do not salt the cooking water as this causes the skins to split and the insides to toughen.

Do not add acidic ingredients such as tomatoes and tomato products at the beginning of cooking as this tends to cause the beans or peas to toughen.

Adding a small (3-5cm) piece of kombu sea vegetable to the cooking water helps soften beans and improves their digestibility.

All dried beans and peas should be brought to the boil and boiled rapidly for at least 5 minutes. Dark coloured beans such as red kidney beans should be boiled rapidly for 10-15 minutes to kill the toxins in their skins.

Cooked pulses can be frozen for future use when ready to use simply add them to your dish, no need to defrost.

SOAKING

Long Soak: Prepare dried beans or peas by rinsing and placing in

a large bowl, cover with cold water; cover bowl and soak overnight

at room temperature. Drain and rinse before cooking.

Short Soak: Place dried beans or peas in a large saucepan, cover

with water; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer for 5 minutes.

Remove from heat; soak for 1-2 hours. Drain and rinse before cooking.

Cooking: Place soaked beans or peas in a saucepan; add water to

cover by about 10cm. Bring to the boil; boil for at least 5 minutes

depending on the bean type. Reduce heat and simmer until cooked

 

Dried beans, peas and lentils, collectively known as pulses, have
been part of man’s staple diet since ancient times and are still an
important food for vegetarians and meat-eaters. They are low in fat
and rich in protein, carbohydrates and fibre, as well as being a rich
source of B-complex vitamins and are the best vegetable source of
folic acid, in addition they provide iron, calcium and phosphorous.
They are also a good source of phytoestrogens which are believed
to be beneficial in protecting against osteoporosis and reducing the
risk of certain cancers. Available as dried or canned beans, peas
and lentils they have a long shelf life and are economical.
STORAGE, PREPARING & COOKING PULSES
• Store in an airtight container in a cool, dry place.
• Most dried beans and peas require soaking before cooking, but

 

YIELD

250g dried beans = 1 cup dried = 2-3 cups cooked beans

Allow about ½ cup cooked beans or peas per serve.

1 cup (200g) dry lentils = 2 to 2½ cups cooked

2 cups dried lentils = 4 servings/approx 5 cups cooked

 

A GUIDE TO LENTIL VARIETIES

Beluga Lentils: Also known as Black Beluga, Beluga black and

petite Beluga lentil. This petite shiny jet black lentil is one of the

most expensive. They hold their shape well when cooked. Cooking

time: 40-45 minutes. Substitutes: French green lentils.

Brown Lentils: Also known as Indian brown, German, green,

Continental and Egyptian. The most commonly available and

generally least expensive lentil They are the khaki in colour and tend

to go mushy if overcooked. Cooking time: 15-20 minutes or until

barely tender.

Channa Dal: Also known as chana dal and gram dal. This is the

most popular dal in Indian, it has a sweet, nutty flavour and is a dull

yellow colour. It is made by splitting a small relative of the chickpea.

True besan (chickpea) flour is made by grinding channa dal.

Cooking time: 10-15 minutes. Substitutes: Toor dal or yellow split peas.

Dal: Also known as dhaal, dhal, dhall and daal. This is the Indian

term for peas, beans or lentils that have been split and often

skinned, however it can also be the name for any cooked lentil, pea

or bean dish. Split lentils do not hold their shape well so are an

excellent choice for soups and purees. Cooking time: 15-20 minutes.

French Green Lentils: Also known as Puy Lentils, Lentilles du Puy

and Lentilles Vertes du Puy. Originally grown in the volcanic soils of

the Puy in southwest France, this lentil is now also grown in North

American and Italy. Cooking time: 40-45 minutes. Substitutes:

Beluga lentils or brown lentils (take care not to overcook).

Moong Dal: Flat and yellow in colour. Quick cooking, moong dal is

skinned and split mung beans, that are relatively easy to digest.

Cooking time: 20-25 minutes Substitutes: Yellow split peas.

Red Lentils: Also known as massor dal, maser dal, mussor dal,

masur dal and pink lentil. This fast cooking lentil has a mild earthy

flavour with a soft texture and varies in colour from a deep orange to

salmon red turning golden and mushy when cooked. Cooking time:

10-15 minutes Substitutes: Yellow split peas or brown lentils.

 

 

A GUIDE TO BEAN & PEA VARIETIES

While by no means exhaustive this guide is intended to help

demystify this valuable food source. Cooking times are approximate

and are for pre-soaked beans – cooking time depends of the type,

age and quality of the beans.

Adzuki Beans: Also known as azuki beans, aduki beans or red

Oriental bean. Pronounced a-Zoo-kee they are lower in fat and

easier to digest than other beans. Used to make sweet red bean

paste they are also good in rice dishes and salads and for sprouting.

Cooking time: 30-45 minutes. Substitutes: Red kidney beans.

Black Turtle Beans: Also known as black beans, turtle beans,

Mexican black beans, Spanish black beans or frijole negro. A staple

of Latin American cooking. Not to be confused with fermented black

beans which are used in Asian cuisine. Cooking time: 45-60 minutes.

Black-eyed Beans: Also known as black-eyed peas, cowpea,

black-eyed Suzy, poor man’s pea or Southern peas. These small

creamy-white coloured beans have a black scar on the edge where

they were joined to the pod and when cooked have a wonderful

creamy texture. Cooking time: 40-60 minutes.

Blue Peas: Varieties of blue peas include marrowfat, Prussian

blue , Harlee blue and whero all of which can generically be referred

to as blue or field peas. These are green peas which are left to

mature and dry naturally in the field before harvesting. Used to make

mushy peas and are great for sprouting. Cooking time: 50-60 minutes.

Borlotti Beans: Also known as cranberry beans or Roman beans.

Commonly used in Italian soups and stews. Cooking time: 40-60

minutes. Substitutes: Cannellini, great northern or pinto beans.

Cannellini Beans: Also known as white kidney beans. This bean

has a smooth texture with a nutty flavour. Cooking time: 40-60

minutes. Substitutes: Great northern or navy beans.

Chickpeas: Also known as garbanzo bean or pea, white chickpea,

ceci bean or cici bean. A staple of Middle Eastern and Mediterranean

cooking they probably best known as the main ingredient in

hummus, but they are also excellent in soups and stews. Cooking

time: 60-90 minutes – very dependant on age and how they are to

be used. Substitutes: Great northern (for hummus), or lima beans.

Fava Beans: Also known as broad beans, Windsor beans and

horse beans. Pronounced FAH-vah—a meaty, strong flavoured

bean which are popular in Middle Eastern cooking. Cooking time:

40-60 minutes. Substitutes: Lima beans or chickpeas.

Great Northern Beans: A white, mild flavoured bean which is often

confused with the cannellini bean. Cooking time: 40-60 minutes.

Substitutes: Navy, cannellini or lima beans.

Lima Beans: Also known as butter beans, wax beans and Madagascar

beans. A large, pillowy bean with a creamy texture and delicate

flavour. Vigorous boiling can lead to the skins coming off. Baby lima

beans and green lima beans are also available. Cooking time: 40-60

minutes. Substitutes: Navy, cannellini or Great Northern beans.

Mung Beans: Also known as mung peas, mungo beans and green

gram. These small olive green beans are available whole or split

(moong dal), they can be used in stews and salads and are one of

the most popular sprouting beans. Cooking time: 25-40 minutes.

Navy/Haricot Beans: Also known as Boston beans, Boston navy

beans and Yankee beans. This is the bean traditionally used in

commercial baked beans. Cooking time: 45-60 minutes. Substitutes:

Great Northern, lima or cannellini beans.

Pink Beans: Also known as chilli beans. Similar to pinto beans but

smaller and rounder. Cooking time: 45-60 minutes. Substitutes:

Pinto or red kidney beans.

Pinto Beans: A pretty beige coloured bean with brown streaks that

cooks to a uniform pinkish brown. Cooking time: 45-60 minutes.

Substitutes: Pink, red kidney or borlotti beans.

Red Kidney Beans: Also known as Mexican beans and haricot

rogue. Can range from dark red to light pink in colour and have a

creamy texture with a full flavour. They should be boiled vigorously

for 10-15 minutes at the beginning of cooking. Cooking time: 45-60

minutes. Substitutes: Adzuki, pinto or borlotti beans.

Soy Beans: Also known as soya beans. Due to the possibility of GE

contamination soy beans are now only available to licensed

processors. Organic canned soy beans are available, as are a huge

range of products made from them including tofu, miso, soy sauce,

tamari, tempeh, soy milk and shoyu. Soy beans and soy products

are one of the richest sources of phytoestrogens.

Split Peas: Available as green or yellow. Split peas are a popular

inclusion in soups and stews. They do not require soaking and do

not keep their shape during cooking. Cooking time: 45-60 minutes.

 

We also sell canned peas and beans from Ceres Organics and Chantal Organic Foods

 

 



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